SEAMC 2014Since the first 2001 SEAMC took place at the Kuala Lumpur Alice Smith School, partly with a mission to create a legacy for Steve Warry, the enthusiastic organizer who unfortunately passed away a week prior to the event, the competition has grown in numbers and stature each year. This year saw the introduction of the first ever “North East Asian Chapter” – NEAMC held at Nanjing International School – China.

This is the third year that 3P Learning has been associated with the event as a sponsor and host of the Online Pre-Round held using the top 4 Levels of Mathletics “Live Mathletics” Engine.

Probably every teacher who ever uses Mathletics wants their students to engage in Challenges at higher Live Levels as many students just enjoy the gamesmanship of playing levels 1-4.  Often students try at the higher levels but find that there are less students interacting on this level so they may not be rewarded with a true live game but have to play against a computer simulated opponent at this more challenging level.

The great thing about using the Live Mathletics platform for SEAMC and NEAMC is that all of these very able Mathematics students are only able to access levels 7-10 and only have access across the 2 weekends prior to the event. This ensures that the 400 or so students involved will normally be matched to other very able students to challenge at this top level. It is perhaps unsurprising then that the results usually bear out the assertion that these students are able to lay claim to being among the best in the world. It is worth noting here that all of the top 7 countries on the PISA table from 2012 were all strongly represented at this event. See http://www.oecd.org/pisa/keyfindings/pisa-2012-results.htm

As Live Mathletics Levels increase in difficulty from 1-10, it was important that a “weighting factor” was applied for levels 8-10. In addition, the organisers of the event were keen to ensure that accuracy and speed of response was favored over just volume of right answers, much the same as what happens now in the World Math(s) Day component of the World Education Games Events. For this reason a “SEAMC/NEAMC Score” is derived by taking the product of Accuracy and High Score for a Level and multiplying by 1.25 for Level 8 or 1.5 for Levels 9 or 10. The score is averaged across all 4 levels for the individual score and then averaged across the 3 Team Members to arrive at a Team Score.

Now, prior to reading the results, I’d like you to think about what this score means. To score 30 at level 7, this means that you need to have an accuracy score of close to 100% and then be scoring upward of 30 correct answers to questions like 42 = (-57) = and 3.3, X, 1.9, 1.2 and  in 60 seconds. Higher levels require less correct answers but they are more difficult questions. If you think this is easy I invite you to register for a trial of Mathletics and try this for yourself!

As a part of the sponsorship, Mathletics accounts for one or two year levels in the school were awarded to the top 3 teams in the event.

The top teams were:

SEAMC School Winners

 

3P Learning (Mathletics) also decided to encourage the students a bit more in the event by offering a SAMSUNG Galaxy Tablet 10.1 to the highest scoring student in the event this year. Congratuations to Jiou Choi of Hong Kong International School who did a fantastic job to finish with an overall SEAMC Score of 51.60. An incredible combination of High Score and Accuracy over all of the 4 top Live Mathletics Levels!

The top students were:

SEAMC individual winners